ILT & VILT

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Put the days of dreary lectures and death by PowerPoint® behind you. Our custom, instructor-led training (ILT) delivers group synergy and real-time facilitator feedback to learners with a personalized touch. Engaging activities, such as competitive games, turn up the dial on participation and retention. Can’t get everyone in the same room? Virtual instructor-led training (vILT) offers a cost-saving alternative to traditional classrooms. With appropriate delivery techniques and activities — as well as video, multimedia, and webcams — learners benefit from the group dynamic and peer-based learning. Our Solution Architect team can help craft the perfect blended strategy for you, including pre-work and performance support.

Best Practices for Virtual Instructor-Led Training

You may be considering, transitioning to, or already offering Virtual Instructor-Led Training (vILT) because of its cost-saving and logistical benefits. Are you providing the best experience possible for your learners? Click each button below to check out best practices for becoming an effective vILT presenter and leader.

Create an interactive environment
Keep the participants in mind
Make the content engaging
Use the
virtual
classroom tools
Create an interactive environment
  • Before you begin a session, have participants introduce themselves, test their microphone/phone line, and practice sending a text chat.
  • At regular intervals, conduct a variety of activities that allow participants to think about the content and share their answers over VoIP/phone or text chat.
    – Activities can include case studies, thought provoking questions, problem solving, brainstorming, and practice exercises.
  • Continuously ask participants open-ended questions about the content.
  • Every 15 minutes, have participants complete a Knowledge Check question and send you their answers through text chat.
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Keep the participants in mind
  • Have participants turn off their phones and close their e-mail applications.
  • At regular intervals, ask for feedback on pacing and comprehension.
  • If the session is long, take a break every 45–60 minutes.
  • Encourage participants to send a text chat if they need a break or have questions.
  • Adjust your pace and the content to the participants’ learning abilities and existing knowledge base.
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Make the
content
engaging
  • Speak clearly, confidently, and at a medium pace with pitch variations.
  • Be familiar with the content, and tailor it to the participants’ needs and questions.
  • Use a variety of interactive, dynamic content.
    − Content can include animations, building bullets (maximum of 5 per page), graphics, flowcharts, audio, video, flash interactions, and software simulations. Your multimedia elements can be embedded right into a PowerPoint presentation.
  • Rather than just describing content, try to demonstrate a concept by sharing your screen, showing it visually, or provide examples. Use multimedia elements whenever possible!
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Use the
virtual
classroom tools
  • Have participants use text chat to ask questions, provide feedback, and contribute ideas.
  • Set clear guidelines for using text chat at the beginning of the session.
  • Share your screen when demonstrating a Web page or software application.
  • Practice using the tools and presenting the content before the session.
  • Include activities that utilize breakout rooms and white boards. This keeps learners engaged as active contributors.
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